CSN March Chronicle

The March Chronicle

Greetings and welcome back to faculty! We hope Spring Break was revitalizing! There is much to share with you at the mid-point of the spring semester.
Town Hall Summary 

I held a town hall meeting on the Henderson campus March 10 and one yesterday at the Charleston campus. I am holding one per month and hope you can attend future town halls.

One question I received concerned whether we had plans to reinstitute the practice of having one administrator in charge of each of our campuses. I do have such plans, and an announcement will be forthcoming. I also told the gathering that launching a new CSN website is my top priority for this year and hope to have it complete by September. Stay tuned for more on that.

We had a good crowd at the town hall yesterday on the Charleston campus.

Future town halls are planned for 3 p.m. on April 1 at the Cheyenne campus, Conference Room A, and 2:30 p.m. May 7, at the Charleston campus, room D-101. Please come, and bring your questions.

 

 

 

Integrate II

Representing a major improvement in the processing of human resource and financial transactions is the migration to a new administrative computing system for Nevada’s colleges and universities.  Called “Integrate II,” the implementation process will take the next two years and will change the way all institutions operated.  CSN is positioned well for this implementation, with Mary Kaye Bailey leading our part of the process.

Legislature

There are a number of bills that impact CSN this session. Here is an update.


Gun Legislation

On Education Day, our students met with Sens. Ben Kieckhefer, David Parks, Joyce Woodhouse and other leaders to advocate for CSN.

This past week, Assembly members amended AB 148, better known as “Campus Carry,” to include AB 2, which allows guns to be in vehicles on campus in a locked box. This bill, AB 148, passed out of committee and is headed back to the Assembly floor before heading to the Senate. There is still much about these bills that will likely change before anything is signed into law and we will keep you informed about opportunities to testify. However, there is often very little notice about these hearings, so I encourage you to write or call your elected representatives to let them know how you feel about this type of legislation.

 

SB 227- Silver State Opportunity Grant 

Lawmakers have introduced a bipartisan bill supporting a state-funded, scholarship program for low-income community college and state college students. Sens. Ben Kieckhefer and Ruben Kihuen introduced this transformational legislation. Students must fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), have been determined by the system to be financially needy, take at least 15 credits a semester, and be college ready (meaning they are not taking developmental English or math courses) to be eligible for this scholarship. The resulting “shared-responsibility” policy proposal is meant to provide the student with enough resources so that he or she does not need to work full time while attending college and looks a lot like the program that was implemented in Oregon.  In addition, while NSHE had originally requested $5 million, Kiechhefer and Kihuen boldly requested double that amount for the biennium.
Millennium Update

On Feb. 26, SB 128 was passed out of committee and is waiting to be heard again on the Senate floor before being sent over to the Assembly. This legislation would change the minimum number credits that millennium scholarship recipients are required to take. At CSN students would have to take a minimum of 9 credits where at the four institutions they would have to have 12.
In the Assembly a similar bill, AB 111, was also passed through committee this week. The only different in this bill is that is has an incremental phase-in process.

 

SB 182/AB 399 — Economic Gardening

In the Senate, Sen. Spearman has authored a bill that would help CSN and UNR support local small businesses in our community. Assemblywoman Dina Neal has authored AB 399, which is similar but focuses more on Southern Nevada, and was heard in committee today. This legislation would allocate $300,000 to start a pilot program and help grow a set number of local businesses each through the provision of data and other resources.  Our fantastic team in the CSN Division of Workforce & Economic Development would lead this effort at CSN.

 

In addition to legislation mentioned above, the budget request of the Board of Regents is being heard in several budget hearings.  All expenditure requests are, of course, based on the amount of dollars that state has available, making the Governor’s proposed revenue package a critical focus as the Legislature moves forward.  We are optimistic that the package will be adopted.  Later, in May, the Economic Forum will meet to consider final revenue levels for the next biennium.

 

New National Endowment for the Humanities Grant to fund “Linking with Latin America” Project

Preliminarily, CSN received word of an $116,806 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to partner with the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Latin American Studies as part of the NEH’s Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges program.

CSN’s project, titled “Linking with Latin America: The Border Crisis and Beyond,” will incorporate content related to Latin America and its cultures into humanities courses, bring in visiting scholars for expert seminars, better prepare humanities faculty for a large and increasing Hispanic population, and enhance faculty and staff sensitivity.

Congresswoman Dina Titus calling President Richards to congratulate CSN on receiving the NEH grant.

This NEH grant will enrich the classroom experience and professional development for faculty and staff with a better understanding and appreciation for Latin American cultures. This helps us serve our growing Hispanic student population and provides training for our faculty and staff to better prepare all of our students for successful entry into our global community.

We are very grateful to our Congressional delegation for their support in helping us obtain this opportunity.

Institutional Advisory Council

During the legislative session, CSN’s new Institutional Advisory Council (IAC) is meeting monthly.  The IAC is currently working on creating a recommendation for the names of CSN’s campuses. A subcommittee is developing a survey to go out to the college community in the near future, working with representatives from the local municipalities, Faculty Senate Chair Jodie Mandel, ASCSN Vice President Lizbeth Gonzalez, the CSN Foundation, Institutional Research and members of the business community. The CSN IAC will then consider a diverse array of institutional and community perspectives and provide a recommendation for the Board of Regents to consider.

Vice Presidential Openings
After seven years at the helm of CSN academics, Vice President of Academic Affairs Darren Divine has decided to step down at the end of this semester. We wish him well wherever his journey may take him. Dr. Divine began at CSN in 2000 as a biology instructor and is a tenured professor in that department. We will appoint an interim vice president before the end of the semester and then conduct a national search for the position.

CSN’s Vice President of Student Affairs search is wrapping up. Finalists will be on campus April 7, 8 and 9. There will be a public forum from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. video conferenced to each campus for each candidate, each day, so that you can meet them. Locations are yet to be determined. I hope to have the selected candidate begin, following the next fiscal year on July 1.

Evaluation Recommendations
As you may know, the presidential evaluation held in December and approved by the Board of Regents in March, resulted in several recommendations for the college and my organizational structure in particular. One of the most prominent recommendations, supported by the board, was the expansion of CSN’s executive administration to ensure I receive diverse input, representative of the many groups we serve at CSN.  Likewise, a broadening of the administration will help with communication challenges to ensure broader dialogue and information sharing occurs at all levels and with our many community partners.

One model I’m exploring is to create a 15-20 member senior leadership team that would meet twice each month and an extended leadership team of up to 50 members that would meet twice a semester.  Under this model, the President’s Cabinet would dissolve.
In addition to expanding my administration, two studies were also recommended:  one to examine mandating the AA/AS degree prior to transfer, and the second to examine the feasibility of disaggregating CSN’s campuses to create a quasi-community college district.  A task force for the first study will be announced after spring break. My predecessor formerly completed a study of the second recommendation and I plan on breaking it out for renewed discussion and consideration.


NSHE Board of Regents Chair Kevin Page throws the first pitch at CSN Coyotes’ Board of Regents Night.

CSN Coyotes Baseball

Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents Chairman Kevin Page joined the Coyotes baseball team for our Board of Regents night on March 5. Everyone had a great time, and Chairman Page did a fine job throwing out the night’s first pitch. What’s more, the Coyotes did us all proud, winning the game and improving their already impressive record.

Tenure Congratulations

At the March 5 and 6 Board of Regents meeting, Regents approved tenure for CSN faculty. Congratulations to the following individuals. This is a major milestone and achievement for our faculty:

  • Julian Barroso-Merino, International Languages
  • Denny Burzynski, Mathematics
  • Stephanie M. Espinoza, Library Services
  • Anthony Fortner, Business, Hospitality & Public Services
  • Chieko Fukushima, Applied Technology
  • Kellie Jeanne Hagewen, Human Behavior
  • April Celeste Hebert, Communication
  • Amy Diane Litman, International Languages
  • Charles M. Lohman Jr., Media Technologies
  • Gail Lynn Lupica-Amani, Health Sciences
  • Mary Manoharan, Nursing
  • Elsa M. Mason, Human Behavior
  • Daniel F. McElhattan III, Media Technologies
  • Kevin G. Mess, Applied Technologies
  • Donald D. Mirjanian, Political Science
  • Camille Elizabeth Naaktgeboren, Biological Sciences
  • Robert E. O’Toole, Accounting, Finance, and Computer Office Technology
  • Carrie K. Preite, Biological Sciences
  • Caprice J. Roberson, Library Services
  • Marilyn I. Robinson, Computing & Information Technology
  • Marianne Sampson, Dental Diagnostic & Rehabilitative Services
  • Heidi C. Schneiter, Dental Diagnostic & Rehabilitative Services
  • Julian Chater Smit, Human Behavior
  • Dale Andrew Wallace, Computer & Information Technology
  • Gary E. Widdison, Dental Diagnostic & Rehabilitative Services

CSN Charleston Campus Ralph & Betty Engelstad Health Sciences Building

Campus Master Plans

As most of you know, a series of campus “open houses” are being held this week on each campus to receive feedback on physical master plans for each campus.  These plans provide a framework for future campus development, including building placement, circulation patterns, parking, landscaping, etc.  Internal reviews—including your input–will complement the planning process and improve the final product.   Take some time to review the plans and the options they present.

Faculty & Staff Questions:      

“How likely is a budget cut or an Arizona-type reduction in state support?”

Without Governor Sandoval’s revenue package, there are inadequate revenues for the State of Nevada.  A budget cut would be certain.  With the revenue package, the next biennium would proceed as described in the Governor’s budget.   Regarding an Arizona-type cut to community colleges, it is unlikely.  Arizona’s major community colleges have local funding and high tuition.  Nevada’s community colleges have only state appropriations and low tuition.  CSN, for example, receives about 77% of its budget from the state general fund.

 

“If ‘Campus Carry,’ or other gun-bills get through, allowing firearms on campus or in campus parking lots, will CSN provide training for employees and students on the new laws? Will CSN provide firearm safety training for those who have CCW permits?”

Needless to say, CSN and the higher education system are closely following the campus carry bills.  Should one or more pass and become law, the College and NSHE will abide by the law.  Currently, our efforts are directed in opposition to the proposed legislation; internally, we have not discussed safety training, but certainly could if needed.

 

“Any new information about furloughs, merit or benefits?”

The governor has eliminated furloughs in his executive budget recommendations and provided merit for classified employees. We continue to advocate for improvements to health and other benefits as well as the inclusion of NSHE professional faculty and staff in the merit program so that we can treat employees equitably and also provide incentives to keep our highly talented faculty and staff at CSN.

 

Best,

 

Mike

Thousands of K-12 Students to Experience Hands-on Science, Technology

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

 

Thousands of K-12 Students to Experience Hands-on Science, Technology

CSN’s 12th Annual Science & Technology Expo on April 24 will engage more than 2,500 K-12 students!

 

LAS VEGAS, March 25, 2015 – Schoolchildren who are part of the next generation of science and technology pioneers will enjoy a day of fun and learning at the 12th annual CSN Science and Technology Expo taking place on Friday, April 24.

The College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and the Clark County School District (CCSD) will welcome thousands of K-12 students to the event located on CSN’s Cheyenne campus. The event also kicks off the annual Las Vegas Science & Technology Festival.

The expo promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs that help prepare students for high-demand, high-wage careers. CSN and many community partners from industry and academia offer this opportunity to spark students’ interest in scientific and technological professions.

This year, more than 2,500 students are expected to attend the free educational expo. Community members are also welcome.

“Helping schoolchildren become excited and passionate about science, technology, engineering and math is the greatest achievement we can make as educators,” said Dr. Michael Spangler, dean of CSN’s School of Advanced & Applied Technologies. “Careers in these fields are in high demand, they pay well, and they’re vital to Nevada’s and our nation’s future.”

Exhibits and demonstrations include:

 

  • Web design demo
  • Apprenticeship exhibits
  • Fighting robots
  • Chemistry magic show
  • Planetarium shows
  • Creepy crawlers
  • 3D printing
  • Journey to space
  • And much more!

 

The Science and Technology Expo will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and is free to attend. For more information please call 702-651-4959.

What:              CSN’s 12th Annual Science & Technology Expo

When:             9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, April 24

Where:            CSN Cheyenne campus, 3200 E. Cheyenne Avenue, Las Vegas, NV 89030

 

About CSN

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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College of Southern Nevada to Institute Safe Zones

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

 

College of Southern Nevada to Institute Safe Zones

New program to help establish a welcoming, safe, inclusive environment for the LGBTQ community

 

LAS VEGAS, March 20, 2015 – College of Southern Nevada officials are excited to announce the launch of its Safe Zone program, a resource for the LGBTQ community at CSN.

The public is invited to attend the formal announcement of the program with CSN officials and community partners at 2:30 p.m. March 27 in the Paul E. Meacham Student Services building on the Charleston campus.

The Safe Zone program is modeled after programs at colleges and universities across the country. Its aim is to promote a welcoming, safe, and inclusive environment for members of LGBTQ communities and to educate and promote understanding, appreciation and respect for everyone

“The Safe Zone program is directly linked to the college’s mission to create opportunities and change lives through access to quality teaching,” said CSN President Michael Richards. “Students who don’t feel safe and welcome at CSN or any college are, in effect, denied access. We want everyone to feel welcome at CSN.”

The program includes training for CSN faculty and staff and the identification of Safe Zones throughout CSN’s campuses. These Safe Zones will be easily identified by stickers placed in conspicuous areas, and will provide judgment-free zones for students to visit with faculty and staff who have gone through the training, and receive information about resources available in the community. “I am thrilled that this national initiative is coming to CSN,” said Michael Dimengo, CEO of The Center, a Las Vegas nonprofit that supports the rights of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community. “This will be a resource for CSN’s students that has been unavailable until now. We are glad to be a partner in this effort.”

CSN student Michael Pitta said he wished there was a program like Safe Zones years ago, when he came out as gay. “It’s important for students who are afraid to come out to their families to have a place to go to talk to someone without being judged,” he said.

“The training this program offers is valuable and unique because it helps faculty and staff respond to issues that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students face that no one else does,” said CSN Communication Professor Owen Pillion, co-chair of the Queer Inclusive Campus Committee (QICC), which helped establish the program.

Who: CSN President Michael Richards, The Center CEO Michael Dimengo, CSN student Michael Pitta and CSN Professor and Co-Chair of the CSN QICC Owen Pillion

When: 2:30 p.m. on Friday, March 27

Where: Building D, Room 101, the Paul E. Meacham Student Services building on CSN’s Charleston campus, located at 6375 W. Charleston Blvd.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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Federal Grant Will Support CSN Efforts to Expand Hispanic Education

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

Federal Grant Will Support CSN Efforts to Expand Hispanic Education

CSN project titled “Linking with Latin America” to incorporate content relating to Latin America into humanities courses as the college’s Hispanic population continues to increase

LAS VEGAS, March 24, 2015 – With more than one in four students at the College of Southern Nevada of Hispanic origin, the college will begin infusing content relating to Latin America and the Caribbean into its courses with help from a $116,806 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

CSN will partner with the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Latin American Studies on the project, part of the NEH’s Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges program.

CSN’s project will be titled Linking with Latin America: The Border Crisis and Beyond. It will incorporate content related to Latin America and its cultures into humanities courses, bring in visiting scholars for expert seminars, better prepare humanities faculty for a large and increasing Hispanic population, and enhance faculty and staff sensitivity.

In January, CSN announced that it had met the criteria to become a Hispanic Serving Institution as described in the Higher Education Act. Approximately 26 percent of CSN’s student body is Hispanic in fall 2014. To meet those criteria, the college had to show that it has increased programming for underrepresented minority and low-income students.

“This grant will enrich the classroom experience for students and professional development for faculty and staff with a better understanding and appreciation for Latin American culture,” said CSN President Michael D. Richards. “This not only helps us serve our growing Hispanic student population well, it helps us prepare all of our students for successful entry into our global community.”

Richards thanked Nevada’s Congressional delegation for their help in securing the grant.

“Congratulations to the College of Southern Nevada on receiving the prestigious NEH Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges grant. This achievement not only reflects CSN’s ongoing commitment to improving access to higher education and enhancing diversity but also to increasing students’ exposure to different cultures from around the world,” said Rep. Dina Titus (NV-01). “This grant will provide critical resources to strengthen faculty, staff, and students’ knowledge and appreciation of the history and cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean. This is especially exciting for the growing Hispanic student population on campus.”

Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges grants are intended to strengthen and enrich humanities education and scholarship at community colleges. Grants can be used to enhance the humanities content of existing programs, develop new programs, or lay the foundation for more extensive endeavors in the future.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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CSN Libraries Go to the Dogs

 

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

CSN Libraries Go to the Dogs

Therapy dogs will visit campus to help students de-stress as final exams approach

LAS VEGAS, March 16, 2015 – The College of Southern Nevada’s library staff knows that students can get dog-tired as the final exams approach, so they’re inviting students to take a quick break to de-stress.

A group of therapy dogs will visit each of CSN’s three campus libraries throughout the month of April. Students often gather at the library as they work on research papers and group projects, and prepare for upcoming final exams. It can be a stressful time for them.

“A short break of ten or twenty minutes in a stress-free, fun environment can make a big difference,” said Beth Schuck, CSN’s Library Services director.

The therapy dogs are being provided by Love Dog Adventures, a non-profit, all-volunteer animal assisted therapy program.

Schuck said CSN’s libraries are designed to create a welcoming environment for students, and the therapy dogs program is part of that.

The media are invited to attend the event.

Who:               CSN Libraries and Love Dog Adventures

What:             Therapy dogs at CSN’s libraries

When:             Noon to 2 p.m. April 2 at the Henderson Library, A-120

Noon to 2 p.m. April 9 at the Charleston library, I Building

Noon to 2 p.m. April 16 at the Cheyenne library, E-201 in the main building

Why:               Time to relax before final exams and research papers are due

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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CSN “Speed-Networking” event to connect students, employers

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu 

CSN “Speed-Networking” event to connect students, employers

Similar to speed dating, students will have a chance to make their best pitches to tech employers.

 LAS VEGAS, March 13, 2015 – More than three dozen local tech-focused employers will be on the College of Southern Nevada campus Friday, March 20, for a Speed-Networking event designed to give tech-savvy students a chance to show off the skills they’ve learned in college.

Patterned after speed dating, the Speed-Networking event gives CSN students majoring in business, computing and information technology, engineering technology, health information technology and media technologies a chance to meet briefly with employers and “sell themselves” in five minutes or less.

“This is a great opportunity for our students to network with potential employers,” said Warren Hioki, director of the CSN School of Advanced & Applied Science. “Last year’s event was such a great success we were determined to do it again.”

In 2014, the event included 38 student participants and 35 employers from 25 companies, including Century Link, NV Energy, Intel, HP, Dell and many others. Those employers are scheduled to take part again this year, as well as the Clark County School District, Cox Communications, and Northwestern Mutual.

Hioki said he was inspired by a similar event at Michigan State University. “As soon as I saw that, a light turned on and I knew we could do the same here at CSN,” he said.

Students participating are studying computing information technology, graphic design, web design, electronics and other related fields. They will bring resumes with them as they network with employers.

The event will be held from noon to 2:30 p.m. on Friday, March 20, in the June Whitley Student Lounge on CSN’s Cheyenne campus. The media are invited to attend.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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CSN Invites Community Input on Physical Master Plans

 

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Contact: Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

CSN Invites Community Input on Physical Master Plans

CSN to host open houses this month to collect feedback on the master plans for campuses – a CSN blueprint to maximize space!

 LAS VEGAS, March 12, 2015 – What will the College of Southern Nevada look like when all of its campuses are built out to maximum capacity? CSN officials want your feedback.

The college is in the process of developing its campuses’ physical master plans. Once finalized, these plans will provide college officials with a blueprint to maximize space at each of CSN’s campuses and identify where potential new buildings, parking and student spaces are desired. Campus physical master plans are important documents in public higher education that facilitate construction priorities and effectiveness of campus development priorities in place so that when and if funds become available, CSN officials have plans that have received community and college input.

The college will have three open houses at the end of March at each campus, where college officials and architects will be on hand to answer questions and collect feedback on these proposed plans.

CSN Physical Master Plan Open Houses

Charleston Campus

Tuesday, March 24, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Paul E. Meacham Student Services Building Lobby

Cheyenne Campus

Wednesday, March 25, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

June Whitley Student Center

Henderson Campus

Thursday, March 26,10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
C Building Lobby

Members of the public and college community can also ask questions or provide input by emailing csnmasterplans@csn.edu.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN is a community college and offers certificate and associate-degree programs, including fully transferable degrees that allow students to enter four-year institutions as juniors and career and technical programs that allow students to enter a meaningful career upon completion. CSN has three niche bachelor’s degrees in health sciences. In addition, the college provides adult basic education and non-credit workforce training through its Division of Workforce & Education. CSN is a Minority Serving and a Hispanic Serving Institution, where students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, weekend and online classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here.

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CSN February Chronicle

Greetings to all!  There is much activity on many fronts. Please attend my upcoming town hall for further details and conversation. It will take place Tuesday, March 10, at the Henderson campus in C-133 at 3 p.m. The next town hall will occur in March 24 at 3 p.m. at the Charleston campus in I-108.    

Guns on Campus

Assemblywoman Michele Fiore’s campus carry bill, allowing weapons on college and university campuses, will be heard in the Assembly Judiciary Committee on Thursday, March 5, at 8 a.m. The Nevada System of Higher Education opposes this bill (see Faculty & Staff questions below for more information on why.)  If your schedule allows, please go to the Grant Sawyer Building at 555 Washington Ave. and plan to provide public comment. Or send an email to members of the committee and your legislative representatives to make your perspective known.

We are encouraging all students, staff and faculty to attend or make their voices known and will send out additional communications once the agenda for the meeting is posted. More on other legislative issues below.

Black History Month

CSN President Michael D. Richards speaks at the President’s Forum on African American Students on Feb. 19.

I want to thank our Black History Month Committee for a fantastic month of events. I would like to note that this committee works hard to highlight the importance of the African American community year round with dynamic student mixers, coffee gatherings and more.

Last week, we held the President’s Forum for the month and had an engaging discussion on the graduation of African American students and challenges they face. We appreciated the participation of an excellent panel discussion facilitated by Clark County Commissioner Lawrence Weekly. Look for more information about this as we finalize our plans for a Minority Serving Male Initiative this fall.

March Board of Regents Meeting

At its regular meeting on March 5-6, the Board of Regents will consider a number of CSN items:

1) Recommendations for faculty tenure, 2) Recommendations for Regents Awards and an honorary degree for Mr. Dennis Birr, former principal of Community College High Schools, 3) A discussion on campus naming, 4) An update on Financial Aid, and 5) The periodic evaluation of CSN’s president. The agenda is available at www.nevada.edu and CSN will provide a link to the live webcast on the home page.

On Thursday evening, the Regents have been invited to a CSN vs Utah State University – Eastern baseball game at the Henderson campus. NSHE Board Chair Kevin Page is throwing the first pitch. Go Coyotes!

Other Upcoming Meetings and Events

 

Campus Naming Discussion
The March Board of Regents meeting will include a discussion among Regents on CSN campus names. I asked for this item to be put on the agenda in light of the calls from community leaders in North Las Vegas, Las Vegas and the Metro Chamber to change our Cheyenne and Charleston campus names to the CSN North Las Vegas Campus and the CSN Las Vegas Campus. Understanding that a previous survey of our students, staff and faculty weighted in favor of keeping our campuses’ current names, it would be beneficial to have robust public discussions about this in multiple venues. Whereas CSN is a public entity and more importantly a community’s college, I believe we have a duty to be responsive to our external and internal constituents. I think it would be appropriate for our new Institutional Advisory Council to hear from our students, faculty and staff and community leaders on this matter at their next meeting on March 9 at 11 a.m. in E 327 at the Charleston campus and make a recommendation. It would then also be beneficial for our elected members of the Board of Regents, representing a broad array of constituents throughout the state, to then weigh in on these perspectives and make a decision. As it turns out, CSN’s campus names have never been voted upon.

To make your perspective known, I recommend you send an email to K.C. Brekken by March 4. She will compile all emails and provide to the IAC for review prior to their March 9 meeting. You may also come to the meeting to provide public comment or come to a future Board of Regents meeting. I will send additional communications on this to encourage participation.

Legislative Issues

CSN President Richards with Assemblywoman Olivia Diaz at the Legislature.

It has been one of the fastest starts to Nevada Legislature in recent history. Gun legislation and the UNLV Medical School have dominated the headlines but there are many bills that have been introduced that will affect our students. We are appreciative of the Governor for supporting higher education in his budget and are making the case for additional investments that are necessary to support the future of this state. As it pertains to CSN this includes:

  • A $5 increase in the weighted student credit hour;
  • Merit for professional employees (the executive budget includes this for classified);
  • A $5 million state scholarship or grant for low-income community college and Nevada State College students; and
  • A $6 million Workforce Development Fund.

These Board of Regents’ legislative priorities not included in the executive budget are also critical to supporting low-income students, increasing recruitment and retention of faculty and staff and providing innovative workforce training programs to support new and existing business and industry.

I recently made a visit to our state’s capitol where I met with legislative leaders and pressed for these additional investments.

On Tuesday, I along with the other NSHE presidents attended the Assembly Ways and Means and Senate Committee on Finance Subcommittees on K-12/Higher Education/CIP where the Nevada System of Higher Education budget was presented. There was limited time for public comment and ASCSN President William McCurdy II made an excellent case for state scholarships for low-income students.

On Thursday, the Senate Education Committee had a work session on a bill that would increase the minimum student credits required to obtain a Millennium Scholarship. This bill increases the minimum credits required to be eligible to receive the scholarship from six credits to nine. We support this bill that is sponsored by Sen. Joyce Woodhouse, understanding that we serve many who cannot attend full time. We are watching this bill closely as it transforms and will keep you posted as we know more. ASCSN plans on providing input as well.

I’ll be holding a town hall on March 10 at 3 p.m. at Henderson where we can discuss all of these issues in greater detail. I urge you to come and participate.

First CSN Institutional Advisory Council Meeting

The first Institutional Advisory Council meetings for the state’s four community colleges took place earlier this month. Dr. Walter Bumphus, the President of the American Association of Community Colleges, addressed the councils simultaneously. His remarks and presentation are available on the IAC’s site. The Council then elected a chair, Dr. Nancy Brune, and a vice chair, Jose Solorio.

We are very fortunate to have such active and highly respected community leaders taking on this new role. The minutes from the first meeting and subsequent meetings will be posted on the IAC’s web page (www.csn.edu/IAC) once approved.

CSN PTK Students Make Us Proud!

Each year, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society tasks each chapter with a year-long scholarly project known as Honors in Action. Last year’s topic was Frontiers and the Spirit of Exploration. CSN’s chapter of Phi Theta Kappa elected to focus their research in the health and medicine field, specifically Nanotechnology.

The project included developing research plans and objectives, locating primary and secondary sources, interviewing CSN & UNLV Professors, touring the Nanotechnology lab at UNLV, developing a plan of action and objectives, carrying out the plan, and writing the results.

After conducting extensive research, the problem they identified was a lack of students majoring in the STEM fields. To address the problem locally, the students visited various elementary classrooms within the CCSD and conducted appropriate, grade-level presentations on Nanotechnology in an effort to spark interest and increase the number of students majoring in STEM. Below is the poster highlighting their year-long project in 2014. Congratulations to CSN’s chapter of Phi Theta Kappa for promoting scholarly research within the college and the community.

 

In addition, each year Phi Theta Kappa publishes an anthology of literary works from students who are members of the honor society across the country. This year’s publication featured two CSN students whose literary works were selected to be published and were recipients of the Reynold’s Award (a $500 scholarship). Congratulations to Cassandra Van Gelder and Daryl Watkins.

Faculty & Staff Questions:

“How does CSN feel about legislation allowing guns on campus?” CSN and CSN’s Department of Police have a long history of opposing this legislation for a number of reasons. The primary one being that in an emergency situation it is very difficult for Police to distinguish suspects when there are Good Samaritans brandishing weapons. There is also increased potential for violence or accidents with increased access to guns on campus. Many opponents have also noticed the chilling effect that such a weapon – if not obviously concealed – might have on classroom discussions and others have questioned how guns on campus might impact the minors enrolled through the Community College High School or the children at our daycares.

 

Best regards to all.

 

–Mike Richards

CSN Career Fair Connects Job Seekers and Employers

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

CSN Career Fair Connects Job Seekers and Employers

The public is invited to showcase jobs skills to dozens of recruiters at the March 3 event

LAS VEGAS, Feb. 19, 2015 – The College of Southern Nevada will host its Spring 2015 Career Fair, where approximately 50 employers will tap the local talent pool to fill hundreds of job opportunities and internships available locally and nationwide. The event is open to the public and held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 3, on CSN’s Cheyenne Campus in the June Whitley Student Lounge.

The open forum allows job applicants the opportunity to meet recruiters, learn about job openings and gather detailed employment information. Applicants should dress in interview attire, have resumes on hand and be prepared for on-the-spot interviews.

“The Spring Career Fair offers CSN students and other job seekers a chance to meet potential employers face to face,” said Erica O’Toole, career specialist at CSN. “It’s not only a great networking opportunity, but also a forum for job seekers to learn more about potential employers. Recruiters will be on hand to provide detailed information about their organizations and the jobs available.”

The wide array of organizations planning to attend include 24 Hour Fitness, A Gentle Touch Home Care, Banfield Pet Hospital, Bankers Life, the Bureau of Reclamation, Canyon Ranch Spa Club, Chipotle Mexican Grill, the City of Las Vegas, Clark County Parks and Recreation, Clark County School District, CSN Human Resources, Enterprise Rent a Car, the federal Air Marshal Service, the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, MGM Resorts International, the Nevada Department of Corrections, NV Energy, Opportunity Village, Ramirez Group, the San Jose Police Department, the Social Security Administration, Station Casinos, the Cosmopolitan, Transamerica Financial Advisors, the University of Phoenix, the U.S. Coast Guard, Wells Fargo and many others.

For more information or to host an employer booth, contact CSN Career Services, 702-651-4700.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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CSN to Help Military Veterans Become Nurses

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu 

CSN to Help Military Veterans Become Nurses

Nevada one of six states piloting an innovative program that will award credit based on military training

LAS VEGAS, Feb. 17, 2015 – Military veterans with medical training will soon be able to become Licensed Practical Nurses through a new program at the College of Southern Nevada.

The Medic and Military Corpsmen to LPN program launches this month. It is designed for veteran medics and corpsmen, as well as active duty guard and reserve medics.

“Our veterans and active duty members of the military are the backbone of who we are as a nation. It is our duty to support them, and we gladly do so,” said CSN President Michael Richards. “We are proud that CSN is the first college in Nevada to offer the medic to LPN program.”

Nevada is one of six states piloting the program. At the behest of Gov. Brian Sandoval, the Nevada State Nursing Board and CSN worked together to develop the program. It is similar to one developed at an Arizona community college.

“As a community college, it is our mission to respond to the needs of the community we serve,” said Darren Divine, CSN’s vice president for academic affairs. “Workforce training and retraining will always be a top priority at CSN.”

CSN will report results of the program to the federal Department of Labor, which recently awarded the Nevada System of Higher Education’s community colleges $9,921,831.00 in the latest round of Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) competitive grants.

The purpose of TAACCCT grants is to provide community colleges and other eligible institutions of higher education with funds improve their ability to deliver education and career training programs that will help job seekers get the skills they need for in-demand jobs in industries like information technology, health care, energy, and manufacturing. Previous TAACCCT grants have been used at CSN for home health care worker training and facilities maintenance training.

Medics and corpsmen receive extensive training in the military, much of which overlaps with the training LPNs receive. Under the new program, CSN will award credit to medics and corpsmen and allow them to complete the program in 16 weeks; typically, the LPN program takes two years to complete.

By completing the program in a single semester, students will not only save on tuition and fees, but they will be able to enter the workforce sooner. Once they complete courses, labs and clinical work, students will have to take the National Council Licensure Examination, known as the NCLEX, to become licensed practical nurses.

The demand for LPNs is strong in Nevada and elsewhere in the nation, said Deborah Ain, director of nursing at CSN. LPNs reported an average annual salary of $41,000 in the latest data available from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. The field is expected to see greater than average growth, as well.

CSN’s first class, which begins Feb. 23, will have up to eight students. Beginning in the fall, between eight and 16 students will be admitted to the program each semester.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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