CSN February Chronicle

Greetings to all!  There is much activity on many fronts. Please attend my upcoming town hall for further details and conversation. It will take place Tuesday, March 10, at the Henderson campus in C-133 at 3 p.m. The next town hall will occur in March 24 at 3 p.m. at the Charleston campus in I-108.    

Guns on Campus

Assemblywoman Michele Fiore’s campus carry bill, allowing weapons on college and university campuses, will be heard in the Assembly Judiciary Committee on Thursday, March 5, at 8 a.m. The Nevada System of Higher Education opposes this bill (see Faculty & Staff questions below for more information on why.)  If your schedule allows, please go to the Grant Sawyer Building at 555 Washington Ave. and plan to provide public comment. Or send an email to members of the committee and your legislative representatives to make your perspective known.

We are encouraging all students, staff and faculty to attend or make their voices known and will send out additional communications once the agenda for the meeting is posted. More on other legislative issues below.

Black History Month

CSN President Michael D. Richards speaks at the President’s Forum on African American Students on Feb. 19.

I want to thank our Black History Month Committee for a fantastic month of events. I would like to note that this committee works hard to highlight the importance of the African American community year round with dynamic student mixers, coffee gatherings and more.

Last week, we held the President’s Forum for the month and had an engaging discussion on the graduation of African American students and challenges they face. We appreciated the participation of an excellent panel discussion facilitated by Clark County Commissioner Lawrence Weekly. Look for more information about this as we finalize our plans for a Minority Serving Male Initiative this fall.

March Board of Regents Meeting

At its regular meeting on March 5-6, the Board of Regents will consider a number of CSN items:

1) Recommendations for faculty tenure, 2) Recommendations for Regents Awards and an honorary degree for Mr. Dennis Birr, former principal of Community College High Schools, 3) A discussion on campus naming, 4) An update on Financial Aid, and 5) The periodic evaluation of CSN’s president. The agenda is available at www.nevada.edu and CSN will provide a link to the live webcast on the home page.

On Thursday evening, the Regents have been invited to a CSN vs Utah State University – Eastern baseball game at the Henderson campus. NSHE Board Chair Kevin Page is throwing the first pitch. Go Coyotes!

Other Upcoming Meetings and Events

 

Campus Naming Discussion
The March Board of Regents meeting will include a discussion among Regents on CSN campus names. I asked for this item to be put on the agenda in light of the calls from community leaders in North Las Vegas, Las Vegas and the Metro Chamber to change our Cheyenne and Charleston campus names to the CSN North Las Vegas Campus and the CSN Las Vegas Campus. Understanding that a previous survey of our students, staff and faculty weighted in favor of keeping our campuses’ current names, it would be beneficial to have robust public discussions about this in multiple venues. Whereas CSN is a public entity and more importantly a community’s college, I believe we have a duty to be responsive to our external and internal constituents. I think it would be appropriate for our new Institutional Advisory Council to hear from our students, faculty and staff and community leaders on this matter at their next meeting on March 9 at 11 a.m. in E 327 at the Charleston campus and make a recommendation. It would then also be beneficial for our elected members of the Board of Regents, representing a broad array of constituents throughout the state, to then weigh in on these perspectives and make a decision. As it turns out, CSN’s campus names have never been voted upon.

To make your perspective known, I recommend you send an email to K.C. Brekken by March 4. She will compile all emails and provide to the IAC for review prior to their March 9 meeting. You may also come to the meeting to provide public comment or come to a future Board of Regents meeting. I will send additional communications on this to encourage participation.

Legislative Issues

CSN President Richards with Assemblywoman Olivia Diaz at the Legislature.

It has been one of the fastest starts to Nevada Legislature in recent history. Gun legislation and the UNLV Medical School have dominated the headlines but there are many bills that have been introduced that will affect our students. We are appreciative of the Governor for supporting higher education in his budget and are making the case for additional investments that are necessary to support the future of this state. As it pertains to CSN this includes:

  • A $5 increase in the weighted student credit hour;
  • Merit for professional employees (the executive budget includes this for classified);
  • A $5 million state scholarship or grant for low-income community college and Nevada State College students; and
  • A $6 million Workforce Development Fund.

These Board of Regents’ legislative priorities not included in the executive budget are also critical to supporting low-income students, increasing recruitment and retention of faculty and staff and providing innovative workforce training programs to support new and existing business and industry.

I recently made a visit to our state’s capitol where I met with legislative leaders and pressed for these additional investments.

On Tuesday, I along with the other NSHE presidents attended the Assembly Ways and Means and Senate Committee on Finance Subcommittees on K-12/Higher Education/CIP where the Nevada System of Higher Education budget was presented. There was limited time for public comment and ASCSN President William McCurdy II made an excellent case for state scholarships for low-income students.

On Thursday, the Senate Education Committee had a work session on a bill that would increase the minimum student credits required to obtain a Millennium Scholarship. This bill increases the minimum credits required to be eligible to receive the scholarship from six credits to nine. We support this bill that is sponsored by Sen. Joyce Woodhouse, understanding that we serve many who cannot attend full time. We are watching this bill closely as it transforms and will keep you posted as we know more. ASCSN plans on providing input as well.

I’ll be holding a town hall on March 10 at 3 p.m. at Henderson where we can discuss all of these issues in greater detail. I urge you to come and participate.

First CSN Institutional Advisory Council Meeting

The first Institutional Advisory Council meetings for the state’s four community colleges took place earlier this month. Dr. Walter Bumphus, the President of the American Association of Community Colleges, addressed the councils simultaneously. His remarks and presentation are available on the IAC’s site. The Council then elected a chair, Dr. Nancy Brune, and a vice chair, Jose Solorio.

We are very fortunate to have such active and highly respected community leaders taking on this new role. The minutes from the first meeting and subsequent meetings will be posted on the IAC’s web page (www.csn.edu/IAC) once approved.

CSN PTK Students Make Us Proud!

Each year, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society tasks each chapter with a year-long scholarly project known as Honors in Action. Last year’s topic was Frontiers and the Spirit of Exploration. CSN’s chapter of Phi Theta Kappa elected to focus their research in the health and medicine field, specifically Nanotechnology.

The project included developing research plans and objectives, locating primary and secondary sources, interviewing CSN & UNLV Professors, touring the Nanotechnology lab at UNLV, developing a plan of action and objectives, carrying out the plan, and writing the results.

After conducting extensive research, the problem they identified was a lack of students majoring in the STEM fields. To address the problem locally, the students visited various elementary classrooms within the CCSD and conducted appropriate, grade-level presentations on Nanotechnology in an effort to spark interest and increase the number of students majoring in STEM. Below is the poster highlighting their year-long project in 2014. Congratulations to CSN’s chapter of Phi Theta Kappa for promoting scholarly research within the college and the community.

 

In addition, each year Phi Theta Kappa publishes an anthology of literary works from students who are members of the honor society across the country. This year’s publication featured two CSN students whose literary works were selected to be published and were recipients of the Reynold’s Award (a $500 scholarship). Congratulations to Cassandra Van Gelder and Daryl Watkins.

Faculty & Staff Questions:

“How does CSN feel about legislation allowing guns on campus?” CSN and CSN’s Department of Police have a long history of opposing this legislation for a number of reasons. The primary one being that in an emergency situation it is very difficult for Police to distinguish suspects when there are Good Samaritans brandishing weapons. There is also increased potential for violence or accidents with increased access to guns on campus. Many opponents have also noticed the chilling effect that such a weapon – if not obviously concealed – might have on classroom discussions and others have questioned how guns on campus might impact the minors enrolled through the Community College High School or the children at our daycares.

 

Best regards to all.

 

–Mike Richards

CSN Career Fair Connects Job Seekers and Employers

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

CSN Career Fair Connects Job Seekers and Employers

The public is invited to showcase jobs skills to dozens of recruiters at the March 3 event

LAS VEGAS, Feb. 19, 2015 – The College of Southern Nevada will host its Spring 2015 Career Fair, where approximately 50 employers will tap the local talent pool to fill hundreds of job opportunities and internships available locally and nationwide. The event is open to the public and held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 3, on CSN’s Cheyenne Campus in the June Whitley Student Lounge.

The open forum allows job applicants the opportunity to meet recruiters, learn about job openings and gather detailed employment information. Applicants should dress in interview attire, have resumes on hand and be prepared for on-the-spot interviews.

“The Spring Career Fair offers CSN students and other job seekers a chance to meet potential employers face to face,” said Erica O’Toole, career specialist at CSN. “It’s not only a great networking opportunity, but also a forum for job seekers to learn more about potential employers. Recruiters will be on hand to provide detailed information about their organizations and the jobs available.”

The wide array of organizations planning to attend include 24 Hour Fitness, A Gentle Touch Home Care, Banfield Pet Hospital, Bankers Life, the Bureau of Reclamation, Canyon Ranch Spa Club, Chipotle Mexican Grill, the City of Las Vegas, Clark County Parks and Recreation, Clark County School District, CSN Human Resources, Enterprise Rent a Car, the federal Air Marshal Service, the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, MGM Resorts International, the Nevada Department of Corrections, NV Energy, Opportunity Village, Ramirez Group, the San Jose Police Department, the Social Security Administration, Station Casinos, the Cosmopolitan, Transamerica Financial Advisors, the University of Phoenix, the U.S. Coast Guard, Wells Fargo and many others.

For more information or to host an employer booth, contact CSN Career Services, 702-651-4700.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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CSN to Help Military Veterans Become Nurses

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu 

CSN to Help Military Veterans Become Nurses

Nevada one of six states piloting an innovative program that will award credit based on military training

LAS VEGAS, Feb. 17, 2015 – Military veterans with medical training will soon be able to become Licensed Practical Nurses through a new program at the College of Southern Nevada.

The Medic and Military Corpsmen to LPN program launches this month. It is designed for veteran medics and corpsmen, as well as active duty guard and reserve medics.

“Our veterans and active duty members of the military are the backbone of who we are as a nation. It is our duty to support them, and we gladly do so,” said CSN President Michael Richards. “We are proud that CSN is the first college in Nevada to offer the medic to LPN program.”

Nevada is one of six states piloting the program. At the behest of Gov. Brian Sandoval, the Nevada State Nursing Board and CSN worked together to develop the program. It is similar to one developed at an Arizona community college.

“As a community college, it is our mission to respond to the needs of the community we serve,” said Darren Divine, CSN’s vice president for academic affairs. “Workforce training and retraining will always be a top priority at CSN.”

CSN will report results of the program to the federal Department of Labor, which recently awarded the Nevada System of Higher Education’s community colleges $9,921,831.00 in the latest round of Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) competitive grants.

The purpose of TAACCCT grants is to provide community colleges and other eligible institutions of higher education with funds improve their ability to deliver education and career training programs that will help job seekers get the skills they need for in-demand jobs in industries like information technology, health care, energy, and manufacturing. Previous TAACCCT grants have been used at CSN for home health care worker training and facilities maintenance training.

Medics and corpsmen receive extensive training in the military, much of which overlaps with the training LPNs receive. Under the new program, CSN will award credit to medics and corpsmen and allow them to complete the program in 16 weeks; typically, the LPN program takes two years to complete.

By completing the program in a single semester, students will not only save on tuition and fees, but they will be able to enter the workforce sooner. Once they complete courses, labs and clinical work, students will have to take the National Council Licensure Examination, known as the NCLEX, to become licensed practical nurses.

The demand for LPNs is strong in Nevada and elsewhere in the nation, said Deborah Ain, director of nursing at CSN. LPNs reported an average annual salary of $41,000 in the latest data available from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. The field is expected to see greater than average growth, as well.

CSN’s first class, which begins Feb. 23, will have up to eight students. Beginning in the fall, between eight and 16 students will be admitted to the program each semester.

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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Second Annual GEAR UP STEM Conference for Middle School Students at CSN

 

 

 

 

 


For Immediate Release:

Contact: K.C. Brekken, CSN Public Affairs, 702-651-7535, kc.brekken@csn.edu
              Mae Worthey, DETR, 702-486-7991, wmworthey@nvdetr.org

Message to students: STEM is Cool!

2nd Annual GEAR UP STEM Conference for Middle School Students at CSN

LAS VEGAS, Feb. 10, 2015 – The College of Southern Nevada and Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR) are proud to invite elected officials, community leaders and members of the media to join us for the second annual GEAR UP Stem Conference for Middle School students on Feb. 20.

The conference offers a dynamic morning for 130 middle school students to learn about exciting careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields. The students will participate in hands-on lab sessions throughout the morning and then hear from a panel of STEM stars from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. about a variety of career opportunities. The panelists are members of the Governor’s Workforce Investment Board’s sector councils.

The 2014 Brookings Mountain West report, Cracking the Code on STEM: A People Strategy for Nevada’s Economy, recommends teaching Nevada’s youth more about STEM careers to cultivate the next generation of STEM workers. The conference will include students from Harney and Mack middle schools who are assigned to CSN through the grant-sponsored CSN Ambassador Program, which allows students to tour a college campus, hear about exciting careers in STEM fields and experience hands-on activities in robotics, web design, graphic design, coding, IT and more.

“We are pleased to partner with CSN on this important event for Nevada’s youth,” said Don Soderberg, DETR director. “One of our major priorities is preparing youth for the workforce by helping them learn about unique career opportunities. This event will provide valuable information to help these young people learn about careers they otherwise would not have been exposed to.”

What: Second Annual GEAR UP STEM Middle School Conference

Where: CSN Cheyenne Campus, located at 3200 N. Cheyenne Ave., North Las Vegas, in the Telecommunications Auditorium and classrooms

When: Feb. 20, 2015, beginning at 9 a.m.

Schedule:

Welcome: 9:30 a.m.in the Telecommunications Auditorium with CSN President Michael D. Richards

Sessions:

Geology Rocks- Science for Tweens

Dawn Reed: National Security Technologies, LLC & Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy

Changing Attitudes about Math…One Student at a Time!

Dr. Jennifer Gorman, CSN Department of Mathematics

Gadgets, Gizmos, and Gigabyte

Dr. Naser Heravi, Software Program Director, CSN Department of Computing and Information Technology

Panel Discussion: 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the June Whitley Lounge

Moderator: Dr. Warren Hioki, director, CSN School of Advanced & Applied Science

  • Missy Young, Executive Vice President, Switch
  • Joe Riney, Nevada Mining Association
  • Anita Wood, Councilwoman City of North Las Vegas
  • Christina Aldan, CEO of Luckygirl Designs, Co-Managing Director for Girls In Tech and founder of 222Evolve
  • Heather Wilde: GOED Sector Council

Closing Remarks:   

Jeanne Donadio, Career & Technical Education Director- CCSD

Earl McDowell, Deputy Administrator -  DETR, Deputy Director -State of Nevada

Please contact K.C. Brekken from CSN’s Office of Public Affairs if you would like to attend the conference at 702-651-7535 or kc.brekken@csn.edu

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN has achieved federal designation as a Minority Serving Institution and Hispanic Serving Institution. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here.

About DETR

DETR is comprised of the Employment Security Division, Equal Rights Commission, Rehabilitation Division, and the Research and Analysis Bureau. DETR works in partnership with the Nevada JobConnect System to provide training and job placement services to job seekers and to assist employers in hiring practices. It also supports economic development efforts through improving Nevada’s workforce.

 

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CSN First in Nevada to Meet Federal Hispanic Serving Institution Requirements

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Contact: Michael Flores, CSN Communications and Government Affairs Director, 702-610-1853, Michael.flores@csn.edu

 

CSN First in Nevada to Meet Federal Hispanic Serving Institution Requirements 

 

LAS VEGAS, Feb. 2, 2015 – College of Southern Nevada President Michael D. Richards announced today that the U.S. Department of Education accepted the college’s application to be eligible to apply for Title III and Title V funds this spring under the Higher Education Act.

CSN submitted its application to the U.S. Department of Education in December to be eligible to apply for grants and become the first federally designated Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in Nevada.

The U.S. Department of Education defines a HSI as a higher education institution with an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic. The institution must also enroll more Pell Grant recipients than the median Pell Grant enrollment of its peers. The application to become a Hispanic Serving Institution evaluates data from two years prior, so CSN’s application data was based on the 2012-13 academic year.

CSN applied for the designation Dec. 18 and fell short of the new percentage of low-income students (Pell eligible students) required, which increased 10 percentage points in this year’s application from 35 percent of the student body to 45 percent. CSN had 42 percent of students receiving Pell in 2012-13 and applied for a waiver. The waiver requires colleges to submit evidence that they serve low-income and underrepresented students and provide access to postsecondary education and programs to help them succeed. Community leaders and Nevada’s elected officials then wrote letters of support for CSN, its waiver application and the importance of this designation to Nevada.

In order to be eligible for grants under the HSI program, each college and university must meet the HEA’s definition of an Hispanic-serving institution and the conditions of eligibility. Title V grants are awarded for five years. In 2014, the maximum award was $525,000 per year. There were 29 HSIs that received an award out of more than 370 HSI institutions.

 

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CSN January Chronicle

Greetings!

Hope you all had a restful winter break and enjoyed the wonderful professional development sessions offered through CAPE at this spring’s convocation. This Chronicle includes information regarding CSN’s performance in the second performance pool, the state budget, accomplishments and more!  There is much happening in higher education, particularly as preparations get underway for the 2015 legislative session and as CSN engages the community more intensively.

Performance Pool
Congratulations are well due to you all for your hard work these past few years to increase student success. We are seeing results! For the second year in a row, CSN has met its benchmark obligations in the performance pool, which allows us to retain 10% of our budget for the next fiscal year. These benchmarks are based on the number of students that graduate and transfer in specific categories, as listed below. CSN exceeded its benchmarks by 112%, up from the 108% by which CSN exceeded its graduation and transfer obligations in the first year of the performance pool implementation. You’ll recall that the amount of money at stake with the pool will increase by 5% each year until it comprises 20% of our state budget in FY 2018.

 

 

 

 

Media Articles on Furloughs and NSHE Salary Dollars
Last week, a couple of news articles, regarding the state’s $162 million deficit for the current fiscal year, included reports of additional furlough days and salary sweeps that require clarification.

First, the only reduction being proposed for the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) is an elimination of the ability to draw up to $6.5 million in salary adjustment pool funds from the Nevada Board of Examiners.  While this represents a reduction in potential revenue available to NSHE institutions, it will not impact faculty or staff salaries.  This pool was a source of funds to which institutions could apply for dollars to cover salary adjustments to the extent they were not otherwise covered by vacancy savings or other sources. Now institutions will need to cover those expenses and any shortfall from other one-time sources.  

There was also a reference to two additional furlough days.  No additional furlough days are being proposed for NSHE faculty or staff.

 

This Friday, come join us to celebrate the dedication of the Charleston Student Services Building in honor of CSN President Emeritus Dr. Paul Meacham. He was CSN’s longest serving President and the first African American President of a college or university in Nevada. The dedication of the Paul E. Meacham Student Services Building will take place at 1 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 30. To attend, please R.S.V.P. to Michelle.word@csn.edu.
 

Legislative Update and Governor’s Budget

As stated previously in my all email last week, the Governor has released his budget priorities, including the elimination of furloughs and restoration of pay for faculty, staff and students. the NSHE presented its budget to a joint money committee last week. The presentation went well and we expect to continue to advocate for priorities not included in the Governor’s budget, including an increase of $5 for every weighted student credit hour completed, which  CSN would use to advance student success priorities, state funded grants for low-income community college students and a workforce fund among others. The session begins next week on Feb. 2. CSN will have a strong presence up in Carson City to advance these priorities.

Re-Opening of the A Building
On Feb. 11, we will unveil state-of-the-art renovations to the oldest building on our Charleston campus, including three new classrooms and six labs.

The Claude I. Howard Health Sciences Center first opened in 1988 as the college expanded from its roots on Cheyenne Avenue. Howard was a philanthropist and supporter of education whose generous donation helped CSN’s new campus get off the ground.

Come join us to celebrate its re-opening at a dedication ceremony scheduled for 4 p.m. Feb. 11. In addition to renovating 26,000 square feet of the building – about half the existing space in the building – nearly 5,000 square feet of new space was added. The new space houses ophthalmic dispensing, radiation therapy and physical therapy. The $10 million project included modern new equipment for the physical therapy, radiation therapy and ophthalmic assistant programs, as well as some smaller renovations to the veterinary tech area in the adjacent B building.

These new classrooms and labs will enhance the learning experience for our students at CSN and we are excited to show them off to the public. We hope you will join us.

CSN Connections at the Charleston campus.

The purpose of the event, which we offer on all three main campuses at the start of every semester, is to help students get to know CSN and the myriad programs designed to enrich their engagement in the collegiate experience. 

Research shows that students who feel more connected to their college are more likely to succeed. Thank you to all the faculty and staff who worked hard to make the event the success that it was.

CSN High Schools Receive High Marks

The Clark County School District recently noted that three CCSD high schools had a 100 percent graduation rate in 2014: College of Southern Nevada High School East, College of Southern Nevada High School South, and College of Southern Nevada High School West. Congratulations to that wonderful program. We look forward to continuing our partnership with the school district.

 

North Las Vegas City Hall

CSN will begin leasing space in the North Las Vegas City Hall this spring. Vice President of Finance Mary Kaye Bailey and her team will relocate to this space.  The Facilities operation will relocate to the business building on the Cheyenne campus, thereby vacating space in the main building for faculty and staff offices. 

 

CSN Student Body President William McCurdy Receives Prestigious MLK Award

ASCSN President William McCurdy II at the MLK Scholarship Banquet on Jan. 17.

On Jan. 17, I had the honor of attending the Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Banquet at the Orleans with a great crew from CSN. Our very own ASCSN President William McCurdy, Jr., received the President’s Award at the event. This is an exceptional honor and we are very proud of William and his accomplishments.

 

 

 

 

Institutional Advisory Council

CSN’s new Institutional Advisory Council will meet for the first time on Feb. 4 at the NSHE Las Vegas system office. The first hour of the meeting will be teleconferenced with three northern community colleges’ institutional advisory councils for a joint presentation by American Association of Community Colleges President and CEO Dr. Walter Bumphus. The second half of the meeting will pertain to CSN. We have put the agenda and other supporting materials for this new body on the web. Go to www.csn.edu/iac for more information.

 

Town Halls Not Roundtables

The length of this Chronicle is indicative of the multitude of major events, happenings, initiatives and so forth that are underway at CSN. Therefore this semester, I will be conducting monthly town halls to update you on the Legislature and other happenings. There will be one per month and we will rotate among each of our campuses. You will see advertisements for these shortly. Please come and bring your questions!

 

Poster Fair

The second annual Poster Fair on Student Success that took place on Jan. 12 was a fantastic event, enjoyed by all. This was a great way to share information about the unique projects each department has been working on and a demonstration of how engaged this college is in the mission of student success. My thanks to all of you for the work you do and the additional efforts to put together engaging and dynamic posters to communicate your important work.

 

New Web Design
I am excited to announce that the CSN website is being redesigned. This new redesign will focus on successfully marketing our college to future students and parents, while placing emphasis on converting visitors into students. The new website will feature great improvements that will benefit our target audience, including user personalization, interactive maps, guided video tours, improved page owner workflows, simplified degree and certificate processes, extended social capabilities, in addition to other enhancements designed to improve the visitor retention and overall experience.

A portal website is also being designed and launched for current students, faculty, and staff.  The portal’s single sign-on functionality will allow users to login once and gain access to emails, class schedules, Canvas, faculty contacts, important forms, financial information and many more features that’s personalized to the user. In essence, the new portal will provide a dashboard that will help students, faculty, and staff get the best functionality out of multiple CSN internal applications, in one convenient location.

Faculty & Staff Questions:

“What is happening with the Northwest Campus?”
In December, President Obama signed the Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument bill, which converts 22,650 acres to a national park and which also includes the 40-acre Northwest campus parcel. We have waited years for Congress to pass this legislation and are truly grateful. This will open access to postsecondary education in a growing corner of this valley. We are currently working with the City of Las Vegas to finalize the conveyance of the land to us and reviewing the previous plans for this campus’ build out. But in short, we are still a long way off from any ground breaking ceremony.

“Are enrollments up or down this spring?”
Enrollments this spring are slightly up compared to where they were at this time last year. Historically, spring enrollments are lower than fall’s numbers. However, we won’t have an accurate depiction until the mid-semester census.

“Why does the City of North Las Vegas want us to rename the Cheyenne campus?”
It is no secret that Mayor John Lee wants to rename the CSN Cheyenne campus the CSN North Las Vegas Campus. There was an article in the newspaper regarding this recently. Mayor Lee has advocated for such a renaming to help promote the campus to North Las Vegas residents and highlight the college’s presence in North Las Vegas. I continue to look for new ways to accomplish this purpose without a renaming and bring all three of our campuses closer to the diverse communities we serve. I believe our new Institutional Advisory Council will assist us with these efforts.

“What does the President’s proposal for free community college mean for us?”
In his Jan. 20 State of the Union, President Obama announced a $60 billion, 10-year plan, dubbed America’s College Promise that would pay for about three-fourths of a student’s tuition and fees at a community college in states that “opt in” to the program and agree to pay for the remaining tab.  Students would have to attend at least half-time and maintain a 2.5 GPA while making steady progress toward their degrees.

First Congress would have to pass the President’s proposal or some version of it. Then states would have to agree to certain parameters and funding requirements and opt in to allow residents to participate. Most higher education experts are not optimistic that Congress will pass this proposal. The chair of the Education Committee has come out against it.

I know that some of you have heard from students on this proposal. Please urge them to contact their congressional delegates, Rep. Joe Heck, in particular, whereas he is on the Education Committee.

Let me know if you have additional questions.

Best,

Mike

2015 Governor’s Budget Recommendations for Higher Education

From Office of the President Email Jan. 18, 2015:

The Governor delivered his State of the State address last night, outlining his recommendations for the state’s budget over the next two years.  His budget includes the restoration of salaries for professional and classified staff by eliminating the furlough program.

We are pleased to see this significant priority included in the governor’s budget, which lawmakers will begin deliberating upon, starting Feb. 2. Faculty and staff have sacrificed much since the start of the recession and while this effort can never fully restore what was lost, we are grateful to see its inclusion in the governor’s budget. We will be asking lawmakers to support this initiative and ask for your assistance in the coming days.

In addition, the Governor has recommended funding for merit-based step increases for NSHE classified employees. This is an important program that directly impacts many of the lowest paid NSHE employees. It did not, however, include merit for professional employees. Likewise the Executive Budget did not include funding for the Longevity Payment program, which provides semi-annual bonus payments to classified staff based on length of service.

Also as directed by the 2013 Legislature and consistent with the NSHE budget request, the Executive Budget removes F’s for non-attendance from the weighted student credit hour calculation.  This is a net-zero impact to NSHE as a System, but reallocates funds between institutions based on the relative number of F’s for non-attendance each formula budget had.  This reallocation resulted in increases at UNLV, UNR, and NSC and decreases at CSN, TMCC, GBC and WNC.

While most of his speech was dedicated to K-12 needs, the governor recommended overall $76 million in new operating funds for higher education, including $9 million for the medical school and $10 million for graduate medical education.

The majority of these new funds support non-CSN specific priorities and we will continue to advocate for our priorities, including a state funded financial aid program for low-income students, the competitive workforce training grants for community colleges, an increase in the weighted student credit hour, merit for professional employees and longevity pay.

Additional spending in the governor’s budget is paid for through a proposed new business license fee, an increase in the cigarette tax and the continued extension of taxes that were set to expire at the end of this fiscal year. We know this plan is controversial among legislators and will face opposition, so we should by no means expect the governor’s budget to be the final word. The legislative process uses his budget as a starting point and we know that good ideas, student and staff advocacy and good discussions can make a positive impact.

We will keep you posted with regular reports and information on how and when to most effectively contact your legislators to advocate on behalf of our annual 50,000 students.

State-of-the-Art Labs, Equipment for Science Students at CSN to Enhance Learning

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

 

State-of-the-Art Labs, Equipment for Science Students at CSN to Enhance Learning

Renovated Claude I. Howard Health Sciences Center to be Re-Opened

 

LAS VEGAS, Jan. 6, 2015 – The College of Southern Nevada will unveil state-of-the-art renovations to the oldest building on its Charleston campus, including three new classrooms and six labs.

The Claude I. Howard Health Sciences Center first opened in 1988 as the college expanded from its roots on Cheyenne Avenue. Howard was a philanthropist and supporter of education whose generous donation helped CSN’s new campus get off the ground.

College officials and members of the healthcare industry will celebrate its re-opening at a dedication ceremony scheduled for 4 p.m. Feb. 11. In addition to renovating 26,000 square feet of the building – about half the existing space in the building – nearly 5,000 square feet of new space was added. The new space will house ophthalmic dispensing, radiation therapy and physical therapy. The building is used primarily by programs in the Ralph & Betty Engelstad School of Health Sciences.

The $10 million project included modern new equipment for the physical therapy, radiation therapy and ophthalmic assistant programs, as well as some smaller renovations to the veterinary tech area in the adjacent B building.

“These new classrooms and labs will enhance the learning experience for our students at CSN,” said CSN President Michael Richards. “We’re excited to show them off to the public.”

What: CSN to dedicate the Claude I. Howard Health Sciences Center

When: From 4 to 6 p.m. Feb. 11

Where: CSN’s Charleston Campus

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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CSN to Name Student Services building in Honor of Dr. Meacham

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact: Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

 

CSN to Name Charleston Campus Student Services Building in Honor of President Emeritus Dr. Paul E. Meacham

Student Services Building to Bear the Name of Nevada’s First African American Postsecondary President

LAS VEGAS, Jan. 12, 2015 – CSN President Michael D. Richards is pleased to invite members of the community and the media to attend the dedication of the Paul E. Meacham Student Services Building, which will take place on Friday, Jan. 30, at 1 p.m. at the Charleston campus.
The student services building, a cornerstone of the Charleston campus, will be named in honor of CSN President Emeritus Dr. Paul E. Meacham, the first African American president of a Nevada higher education institution.

“President Meacham changed the lives of thousands of students and his legacy should be promoted in perpetuity,” said CSN President Michael D. Richards. “He’s the reason we have the Charleston campus today. A decade after he retired from CSN, there is no better time to honor Dr. Meacham, his service to CSN, its students and Nevada.”
The Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents approved the naming of the building in honor of Dr. Meacham in December.

Dr. Meacham headed CSN for over a decade from 1983 to 1994 and still holds the title of the longest-serving President in the college’s 44-year history. The student services building opened five years after Dr. Meacham retired in 1999, but the 66,644-square-feet facility is a central hub for students on the campus. It contains advising, registrar, cashier’s, financial aid and disability resources services among others. It also houses a number of classrooms, the Veterans Education Center and Tutorial Services on the second floor.

Through his leadership, Dr. Meacham set the vision for the design of the Charleston campus, which was a plot of dirt when he first arrived at CSN and is now the college’s largest campus. He helped secure private funds for its first building, the Claude I. Howard Health Sciences Center, which has recently been renovated and will re-open Feb. 11. Dr. Meacham also oversaw the college at a time of significant expansion and was instrumental in obtaining student spaces on campuses and securing CSN’s membership in Phi Theta Kappa, the national community college honor society, among many other accomplishments.

“Building the Charleston campus was one of the most significant challenges and accomplishments of my tenure as President,” Meacham said. “I owe many of my successes to the terrific faculty and staff at the college, many of whom are still here and I am honored to be forever connected to them and CSN.”

Dr. Meacham will be available for interviews at the dedication ceremony, which will be followed by a reception inside the building.

 

What: Dedication of the CSN Paul E. Meacham Student Services Building

When: Jan. 30, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Where: The ceremony will take place outside in the Palm Tree Circle and will be followed by a reception inside the building

 

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here.

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CSN Welcomes Students Back for Spring Semester

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact:          Richard Lake, CSN Public Relations Specialist, 702-651-7715, Richard.Lake@csn.edu

 

CSN Welcomes Students Back for Spring Semester

CSN Connections events designed to build a sense of community

 

LAS VEGAS, Jan. 12, 2015 – CSN is welcoming students back this semester with events featuring information on student clubs, the services offered, a Welcome Back crew, food, prizes and games.

Students can still enroll for the spring 2015 semester through Jan. 19. The CSN Connections events kick off the semester during the first week of classes on all three main campuses, on Jan. 20, 21 and 22.

“We’ll be greeting new and returning students and offering them whatever help they need,” said Darren Divine, CSN’s vice president of academic affairs. “The food and prizes are a bonus.”

Connections will feature burgers and hot dogs grilled by CSN administrators, dozens of booths hosted by student clubs and campus organizations, and information on counseling, transferring, tutoring and all the other services CSN offers.

In addition, there will be giveaways, a welcoming crew of volunteers to shepherd new students around all three campuses, and plenty of staffers on hand to help students.

CSN Connections was designed to help students get to know the college, which spans three campuses across Clark County. Research has shown that students who feel a connection to their college, including its services and students clubs, are more likely to do well, return, and graduate.

“Student success is the foundation of all that we do at CSN,” said Divine, who came up with the idea for the events several years ago. “There is nothing more important than welcoming students back, making them feel comfortable, and making sure they get all the help they need.”

Here are the times and locations of the events:

·      Tuesday, Jan 20: 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., outside the B building on the Henderson campus

·      Wednesday, Jan 21: 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., outside the main entrance on the Cheyenne campus

·      Thursday, Jan 22: 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., outside the D building on the Charleston campus

 

About CSN:

Founded in 1971 and educating thousands of students a semester, the College of Southern Nevada (csn.edu) is the state’s largest and most ethnically diverse higher education institution. CSN students can choose from 180 degree and certificate options in more than 100 areas of study, including more than 25 degree and certificate programs available entirely online. Students create flexible, personalized schedules, including day, evening, and weekend classes taught on three main campuses and multiple locations throughout Southern Nevada. CSN — your future starts here. CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. For more information, visit http://www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination

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